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LEARN ABOUT YOUR HEART

Here you can read different articles our doctors have been part of or published themselves.

They are related to things such as cardiac disease, treatment,

surgery, heart devices, health tips and more.

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September 1, 2022

“In AFib, the atria, or upper chambers of the heart, beat in an extremely disorganized way (sometimes up to 300 to 600 beats per minute). This leads to an increased risk of stroke and congestive heart failure,” Warrier explained to Healthline.

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Nikhil Warrier, M.D.

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July 26, 2022

“If you’re one of those people … you should ask yourself, ‘Why is it that I feel the need to nap later in the day? Is there something I can do about the way that I sleep [so that] I have better energy later on so that I won’t have to take a nap?'” Dr. Ni explained.

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Yu-Ming Ni, M.D.

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January 24, 2022

"[D]iseases happen due to previous conditions that add up to a heart attack or a stroke, and are not typically due to random events," says Dr. Yang. “By being active, in general, you can burn more calories, lose weight, get muscle tone, feel better in your mind,” says Sanjiv Patel, MD

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Dr. Yang and Dr. Patel, M.D.

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February 2, 2022

The most common reason you might have to check your blood pressure at home is that some people experience "white coat syndrome," where their blood pressure is significantly higher in the doctor's office than it is at home, says Hoang Nguyen, MD.

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Hoang Nguyen, M.D.

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November 17, 2021

Vegetables have more monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats, which can lower your levels of LDL cholesterol and raise the amount of HDL (good) cholesterol in your body, Dr. Wong says. As a result, it can decrease your stroke risk.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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September 30, 2021

“I think for younger patients, it could be an element of noncompliance: not going to doctors, not taking medications — […] especially young men," Wong stated. Moreover, Dr. Wong said, young patients often do not tolerate beta-blockers, a common blood pressure-lowering medication.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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August 31, 2021

Dr. Warrier recalled a January 2021 letter to Heart Rhythm, describing “a potential interaction between defibrillators and the iPhone 12, where the iPhone 12 is close by, to disable therapies.”

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Nikhil Warrier, M.D.

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June 3, 2021

Nikhil Warrier, MD, cardiac electrophysiologist and medical director of electrophysiology at Memorial Care Heart & Vascular Institute at Orange Coast Medical Center, tells Verywell that previous research does support this relationship between stress and cardiovascular issues. 

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Nikhil Warrier, M.D.

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May 15, 2021

Dr. Nikhil Warrier, the medical director of electrophysiology at Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, said the procedure “is an attractive option for closure or litigation in patients who are at high risk for stroke and not ideal candidates for long-term blood thinners.”

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Nikhil Warrier, M.D.

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November 11, 2021

“This is a very small percentage of [a specific group of] people who are reported to have this,” Dr. Wong says. It’s also important to take the risk-benefit ratio into account. The benefits of getting vaccinated so far outweigh the possibility of this rare condition, she says, if a cause-and-effect relationship is confirmed at all.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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June 7, 2021

“We encourage [people],” said Dr. Wong, “to make small changes — small increases in physical activity like walking down that hallway instead of calling up your colleague.”

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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July 22, 2021

“Red meat consumption has been associated with an increased risk of heart disease as well as cancer and Type 2 diabetes,” says Jennifer Wong, MD

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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September 29, 2021

 "You may see stories of young athletes who collapse on the court or field and die—some of them have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy." Dr. Nguyen says that not everyone who has the condition will die suddenly. But, he adds, "the risk is there."

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Hoang P Nguyen, M.D.

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August 5, 2022

“These changes can be adapted to and may help healthy individuals bring down their internal body core temperatures,” Wong told Verywell. “But a person with heart disease may have less reserve to tolerate these hemodynamic changes, leading to cardiovascular complications like heart attacks.”

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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July 7, 2022

Another common disease, liver failure—which affects some 4.5 million Americans, reports the CDC—can also cause swelling or water retention when "the liver [fails] to produce vital protein such as albumin," says Dr. Nguyen.

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Hoang Nguyen, M.D.

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February 14, 2022

In fact, people with depression are prone to unhealthy eating habits, not getting enough exercise, weight gain, and smoking, says Arvind Nirula, MD.

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Arvind Nirula, M.D.

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October 21, 2021

“If you don’t sleep well, stress hormones can build up and cause inflammation. This can potentially trigger a buildup of plaques, which can become unstable and cause heart attack or stroke,” said Patel.

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Sanjiv Patel, M.D.

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October 20, 2021

"Systolic blood pressure is the peak pressure during a heartbeat while the heart is 'squeezing,' and diastolic blood pressure is the lowest pressure between two heartbeats while the heart is 'relaxed,'" notes Jennifer Wong, MD.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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September 22, 2021

 “This [study] gives us a lot more ammunition and a lot more certainty that we should be more aggressive in controlling atherosclerosis risk factors [in] patients or even the general population."

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Hoang P Nguyen, M.D.

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August 3, 2021

The study does not suggest that people with CVD who do not already drink start doing so. Interventional cardiologist Dr. Hoang Nguyen — who was not involved in the study — told MNT:

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Hoang P Nguyen, M.D.

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May 28, 2021

Stress raises blood pressure, which can tax your heart valves and prevent them from closing tightly, says Dr. Wong. One free and easy way to lower your overall anxiety is meditation.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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September 1, 2021

Said Dr. Wong: “I would feel comfortable recommending the handgrip exercise, especially given that most of the trials they looked at here were using hand exercises, and very few adverse effects seem to have been seen in these trials. I might even recommend it with additional aerobic exercise.”

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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February 24, 2021

Some key lifestyle modifications to make to prevent or reduce this condition, says Dr. Wong, include limiting salt intake to 2.3 grams of sodium per day, adding in a potassium supplement (unless contraindicated by kidney disease), losing weight, getting in moderate-intensity aerobic exercise for 40 minutes three to four times per week, and reducing the number of alcoholic beverages you drink per week.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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October 15, 2021

But, it is acceptable to take aspirin on occasion for other reasons, such as pain relief, assuming it doesn’t interact with other medications, says Dr. Patel. Taking aspirin in the short-term is not going to hurt you, but long-term everyday use is what’s concerning, he says.

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Sanjiv Patel, M.D.

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August 2, 2022

"Please come to the clinic with questions you want to ask," Ni implores. "Your doctor is more than happy to spend the visit telling you what they are concerned about and what you should be doing for your health—but a conversation goes both ways. You should also have the chance to share your concerns too."

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Yu-Ming Ni, M.D.

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February 12, 2022

“In general, our emotional and mental health is closely bound to our physical health,” says Dr. Sarah Elsayed. "The COVID-19 pandemic for example, has shown us an increase in patients diagnosed with hypertension, palpitations and shortness of breath."

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Sarah Elsayed, M.D.

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December 20, 2021

...Since this is a comparatively newer diagnosis versus “cardiac conditions such as hypertension and coronary artery disease,” providers often misunderstand it. says Hoang Nguyen, MD.

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Hoang Nguyen, M.D.

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November 1, 2021

Inflammation from the flu can cause plaques, cholesterol, fatty substances, waste products, and calcium, in the wall of your arteries to rupture, leading to blockages and heart attacks, Dr. Wong says.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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November 8, 2021

Nikhil Warrier, MD, cardiac electrophysiologist and medical director of electrophysiology at Memorial Care Heart & Vascular Institute at Orange Coast Medical Center, tells what are heart palpitations? | Heart palpitations symptoms | Heart palpitations causes | Heart palpitations triggers | When to worry about heart palpitations | When to see a doctor | Heart palpitations treatment and prevention

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Nikhil Warrier, M.D.

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July 26, 2021

"A study showed that people with type A or B blood were 51% more likely to develop blood clots in the veins and 47% more likely to develop blood clots in the lungs," says Leann Poston. "Specifically, type A blood puts you at 6% higher risk of heart disease; Type B with a 15% higher risk; and Type AB puts one at 23% higher risk," says Hoang P Nguyen, MemorialCare.

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Hoang Nguyen, M.D.

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May 18, 2021

“These findings are similar to prior studies with older adults. However, this is an observational study and thus does not prove causation,” she says. 

Doctor: Dr. Jennifer Wong, M.D.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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February 8, 2021

Coronary artery disease is caused by plaque buildup in the arteries of the heart in a process called atherosclerosis, which can start in one’s teens and 20s,” says Jennifer Wong, M.D.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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November 8, 2021

People with a blood pressure range of 90 to 120 systolic and 60 to 80 diastolic have normal blood pressure, says Dr. Wong. A systolic reading below 90 signifies low blood pressure.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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February 24, 2021

[Dr. Wong] points out that studies are needed to look into the effects of treating women at a lower blood pressure threshold before this would become common practice.

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Jennifer Wong, M.D., FACC

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October 13, 2021

But Dr. Patel urges people not to take the potential risks lightly that are associated with having a daily aspirin. "Even though this is an over-the-counter medication, it can cause serious side effects," he says. "The longer you take it, the more risk that you will have these side effects."

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Sanjiv Patel, M.D.